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πŸ”₯ Why break-in on power supply? - Motors & Motor Building - Slotblog

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Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated or is there another reason you run them in for 20 plus minutes?
I have a feeling I know the answer but I wanted to get the https://crimeaorg.info/box/casino-slot-money-box.html from some of the pros out in slot car land.
But, I have a question, to your question.
Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated?
If you have a way to determine at what point the brushes have a perfect contact patch, I would be interested in that?
I can't tell if they are perfect but I was just making sure the only reason you run a motor is to mate the comm and the brushes.
I guess I was wondering if the comm needed to run and get some???
Just a question I was thinking about today while the motor I was breaking-in was giving me a headache because of the high pitch it was making.
Thanks, Dallas PS: I have seen some of your info on here on other topics and I would say you know what you're talking about so that would make you a Pro.
The purpose of "break-in" is to mate the brush surface to the comm surface as perfectly as possible.
The definition of "perfect" varies, depending on the type of motor.
In a G12 motor, you can remove the brushes and eyeball the elliptical curve of the brush faces.
If and when both brush faces appear perfectly elliptical, you have achieved the goal of "perfectly-mated brush contact comm patch".
Anything further than this is outside my expertise.
I am just an amateur.
PM Hershman or Wells or Swiss to gain more info.
If your motor sounded "high pitch", that may be a good thing.
Make sure the brushes are totally seated to the comm.
You want a full arc across the edge.
You can always pull a brush and check to see if it has fully seated or not.
If you don't like the noise and time, you could always try the water break-in method.
Only takes a couple of minutes and almost silent.
There are Pros that swear by this method and other Pros that put it down?
Which Pro is "correcter"?
Rick Bennardo "Professional Tinkerer" LIKE my Facebook page for updates, new releases, and sales: Rgeo Slots.
Basically I run the motor and watch current draw, as the motor heats up it starts to draw less and less current - at some stage - say about five min in you hear a definite change in RPM as the revs go up - this seems to coincide with the minimum current draw.
My view has been this is the point when the run in is finished.
Leaving the motor longer to me seems to be a negative thing to do and more likely to cause excessive carbon build-up on the com.
On a new motor or one that's been "rebuilt" quotes because the word means ho slot car break in box things to different people you're looking at the entire system as it runs for the first time.
There's the bushings or bearings to consider, the springs, the leads and shunts if applicableendplay, etc.
You can see how it's all working together and make any minor corrections on a bench before you slot lock box the motor in a car.
I think that, besides running-in the brushes, a few minutes break-in is the time to let the motor settle-in and be sure it's all doing what you want it to.
I've used both water and run in, and have gotten good results with both.
However, water break-in can be tricky at first if you're new to this.
OWH has a thread on this topic, and if you follow the instructions as written, you can get very good results and save a ton of time.
I remember when I first heard about water break-in, I thought it was crazy!!
But after giving it a try, it didn't take me long to see the advantage.
The only problem I had was I was one of the people who had a bad batch of brushes that went away in less than 30 secs in water at 4 volts.
After having that happen I decided to go back to the old way of doing things, and have stuck with the old tried and true ways.
For myself, I like running them in for a couple of different reasons.
One, being that I can hear what's going on, and two, being I like to watch the amp draw as the motor breaks-in.
I'm not saying it's the right way, Its just what seems to work for me.
I'll usually run them for 20-30 mins starting at 4 volts and working my way up to 6, checking heat and amps as I go.
You can usually tell by pitch and amps when it's enough time.
The pitch will become steady and the amp draw will even off and remain steady as well.
If it's a dud, it doesn't matter how much time you break it in, or how you break it in, it's still going to be a turd.
How does it help?
What this does is allow the brush to more fully contact the commutator over a wider area effectively reducing motor resistance, consequently increasing motor powerwhich reduces the amount of electricity that flows through a given piece of the brush.
This in turn reduces resistance and arcing between the bushes and the commutator as the current is transferred to the commutator over a wider contact patchwhich also alleviates the microscopic pitting, excessive carbon soot build-up, and excessive heat build-up.
All of this in turn makes the motor last longer, be more reliable, and draw current more predictably and run more efficiently see note at the endwhich results in better and longer battery life.
The carbon soot is non-conductive, and adds resistance to a motor, which causes it to heat more where the resistance is, which can cause the brushes to fuse to the commutatorand loose power because energy is being wasted in resistance in the form of heat before it ever even gets to the motor windings.
The arcing in the motor over a smaller surface area, such as using a motor that has not been broken-in, causes more electricity in a smaller area of the brush, which causes more heat in that particular area, which basically burns the carbon brushes creating the high resistance carbon soot, and also creates microscopic pits in the commutator and brush where the electricity arced from and to.
This basically creates microscopic sand paper that also contributes to the early demise of the motor.
This is a double drawback because it consumes the brushes faster, and causes pitting and carbon build-up which reduces the power of the motor, the battery life, and causes excessive heating in the motor which can fuse the brushes to the commutator.
Types of Break-ins: Wet or Dry, Why or Why Not?
I have heard several explanations of the break-in process, and some of them involve putting the motor in water, rubbing alcohol.
There are a few reasons to do some of these, and a few reasons not to.
The main reasons I have heard to do the break-in in water is to reduce pitting during motor arcing in the break-in, and to keep the temperature down low, and wash away the carbon buildup during break-in.
To dispel some myths about water break-ins, no, it will not short circuit, nor will it fry the motor, or over current the batteries or whatever you are using to break-in your motor.
To test this for yourself take an ohm meter and place the probes in the water, and vary the distance between them.
You will see that the ohm reading is quite high, though it still conducts electricity.
Also it should be noted that pure water is among the best insulators on the planet.
It is just the ion and particles dispersed in the water that conduct the electricity such as lime calcium magnesium and salt.
One thing to note with a water break-in however is that it is best to use distilled water if you are going to use water to break-in your motors.
The reason for this is because regular water or hard water can leave a residue of minerals on the motor parts, which could cause undesirable performance, or corrosion, and it does not conduct electricity.
Another thing to note with the water break-in is that there are small nooks and crannies in DC motors for water to stay, and over time rust click corrode the inside of the motor.
These places include the https://crimeaorg.info/box/ups-deposit-box.html between the commutator, between the commutator and the armature windings, where the armature meets the shaft, in between the plates of the armature, and so on.
All the water needs to be forced out somehow.
Taking the motor apart is not preferred because it can change how the brushes seat, effectively reducing your break-in.
A lot of people use compressed air, especially the motors with a hole in the side of the can.
Obviously the smaller motors are much harder to get the water out of.
The other thing is that most slot cars have very open motors that you can get the water out of easily.
Now to rubbing alcohol.
This provides many of the same benefits as the water break-in, such as reduced motor temps, reduced to no pitting from arcing, but also adds a much better cleaning power for the commutator and the brush contacts.
Alcohol also has a much higher vapor pressure, which basically means it evaporates faster and more completely please click for source water, causing less corrosion.
Alcohol is also flammable so caution needs to be taken that way, although I really doubt that anything would catch on fire with such low current and voltages.
I've tried water but I prefer dry.
I usually run the motors in on my power supply at low voltages 2.
I have run Falcon motors over night before I've seen the brushes get fully seated 6-8 hrs.
I used to race wing cars fifteen years ago and would break-in motors Box 12, Int 15, G27, G7 at around 3 volts until the motor "settled", usually 20-30 mins.
Of course, I radiused the motor brushes first.
I have used a naphtha drip after water break-in, and that seems to work good.
As I mentioned above, I had some brush problems with the last few water break-ins I did, but that was a while back and I'd be willing to give it another try now.
Water break -n does seem to work really well providing you have good brushes LOL.
Also as said above, it's very important to get all the water out.
I use about 40-50 psi of compressed air, blow it out real good, oil it up, run it at 4 volts using a couple drops of naphtha on the comm for a few mins and done deal.
If you have noticed, motors have a slow period up to the peak period then downhill to the point of needing rebuilding.
The peak period is what you want in a motor that is to be raced, hence the break-in of the brushes to the peak point in the motor's performance.
That ensures you have a fast car from the start and hopefully throughout the race.
It sure beats the heck out of putting a new motor in a car and having to wait for the brushes to seat before you become competitive.
Listen to all these guys, they are a wealth of knowledge.
A pure alcohol is fine as a break-in medium but take note that many rubbing alcohols contain oils as additives.
Pete Varlan The most radical of revolutionaries inevitably becomes an arch conservative immediately after his revolution succeeds.
Rick Bennardo "Professional Tinkerer" LIKE my Facebook page for updates, new releases, and sales: Rgeo Slots.
Naphtha has oil in it.
Pull the motor out of the water when it running and listen to that arching that is pitting the comm.
Don't get all the water and slurry out from between the brushes and hood and you asking for a "stuck" brush in the hood in the middle of a race.
A waste of alcohol IMO.
You always want to radius the brushes before breaking in the motor.
You want to run them in dry so you can find out what the motor does when it get warmer.
I have had arms fry when I was running them in dry.
I would rather have them fry on the power pack versus in the middle of a race.
I also like to know how hot a motor may get in the shop versus at the track and after the motor is in the car.
If the motor runs cool on the power supply and gets real hot on the track.
Also by running them in dry.
Water-dipping a motor for 30 seconds or whatever some rocket scientist tells you then blowing them out and reving them on a power supply tells you nothing about the bad brushes, springs, spacing, or bushings or bearings.
If you don't like listening to the motor run in.
The difference in time depends on the class of the arm and the RPM of the motor.
This is at 3 to 4 volts.
Many times I will put on higher tension springs on motors to break them in while increasing the voltage.
This causes quicker run-in time, less arching as long as the motor doesn't run too hot due to increased spring tension.
If you can't hold the motor and count to five because it's too hot.
To tell if your brushes are fully seated.
Look at the face of the brush.
There is no actual time tesco free voucher codes take to run in a motor.
Three volts on my power supply.
Don't trust the volt meter on your power supply.
Water-dipping is nothing but a "short cut" to motor building and prepping motors.
If you're going to water dip your motors you may as well quit retruing your commutators as that will save you a little time, too.
One blast down the straightaway and your comm is all sooted up.
I got my answer in a roundabout way.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run time, it's just the brushes.
I use an inertia dyno to develop my motor programs.
I've tried dozens of variations of the break-in: wet, messages panda stealing coin money box share atomized mistand dry with all manner of finishes, and with many different brushes, winds, and magnet set-ups.
Ceramic Hawks to Open 7 multi-wound quad Neo motors exceeding one full RMS horsepower.
I have yet to see an improvement on the dyno that didn't directly and quantifiably translate to the track.
Best method to date has been wet, in water, no naphtha finish, and a good 100 psi compressed air blow-out.
One micro drop of KD brush lube turned by hand several revolutions followed by about 15 seconds at 3 volts dry time, just to check and record base amperage for that motor.
I keep a book.
I start with the power supply pre-set and go in five second burst to check brush hardness before committing the package fully to the break-in.
Sometimes it's done in 5 seconds, sometimes 90 seconds.
Lowest voltage is 1.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run ho slot car break in box it's just the brushes.
Yep, if I was drag racing.
I would probably break the brushes in under water.
In drag racing they have to run 1.
Having said that doesn't mean I don't watch.
In drag racing we run around 16 volts, road cars 14-ish.
We drop the full voltage over the arm the entire race.
Road cars are not only throttled but choked.
My heats last under.
Enduro racing over several hours.
Road cars run in spray glue, we run in a river of drag glue and ask every last watt of the click the following article />Current loads are huge.
We, at the quickest levels, rarely use a wiper and the control is more akin to dropping a copper bar over the terminals drawing upward of twice the current on the launch as an open wing will from a standstill.
I read in another thread on this board somewhere where a racer hooked an O-scope to a road track to find the current spike racing an open and if I remember right tesco free voucher codes was about 125 amps averaging around 65 amps a lap?
I can tach over 250 amps on the hit and still be pulling over a 100 amps out the back on tracks that can supply that much current.
Point is, current related heat is an issue at the top levels, a big issue.
We "ice" the arm with liquid butane between rounds.
Failure to do so will smoke an arm in the late rounds where there is little time in as little as two passes thus endurance is also an issue.
We run the same motor for two to four rounds of qualifying and four rounds during the event.
I use my method to extend that to around ten to twelve passes.
Granted, ten passes is under 5 seconds of racing between rebuilds.
It would be rare indeed to see a semi or finals race pass quicker than qualifying.
In fact, I'd bet my last pair of blue socks that a Neo open could not make a full King road lap.
An open road motor can spin well over 200,000 RPM.
We run so much spring and such heavy magnets that 150,000 is hard to reach.
We beat that comm harder in 2.
Heat-related comm failures are very common, often eliminating over half the field.
Early traction loss will take a few more to either winding toss or tire explosions.
Given all that I wouldn't attempt to run a Nitro motor in an Indy car or an Indy motor is a Nitro car.
They are worlds apart.
As such, Tesco free voucher codes have no real useful input on what makes a great road motor, how to build one or how to tune one.
Break-in is certainly part of that tune-up.
I can only wonder that if I can double my motor life, peak performance that is, a few rounds by this method how that "might" play out for a road motor.
I marvel watching Open 7 wings and just cannot figure out how you can drive a car the eye can't follow.

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Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated or is there another reason you run them in for 20 plus minutes?
I have a feeling I know the answer but I wanted to get the info from some of the pros out in slot car land.
But, I have a question, to your question.
Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated?
If you have a way to determine at what point the brushes have a perfect contact patch, I would be interested in that?
I can't tell if they are perfect but I was just making sure the only reason you run a motor is to mate the comm and the brushes.
I guess I was wondering if the comm needed to run and get some???
Just a question I was thinking about today while the motor I was breaking-in was giving me a headache because of the high pitch it was making.
Thanks, Dallas PS: I have seen some of your info on here on other topics and I would say you know what you're talking about so that would make you a Pro.
The purpose of "break-in" is to mate the brush surface to the comm surface as perfectly as possible.
The definition of "perfect" varies, depending on the type of motor.
In a G12 motor, you can remove the brushes and eyeball the elliptical curve of the brush faces.
If and when both brush faces appear perfectly elliptical, you have achieved the goal of "perfectly-mated brush contact comm patch".
Anything further than this is outside my expertise.
I am just an amateur.
PM Hershman or Wells or Swiss to gain more info.
If your motor sounded "high pitch", that may be a good thing.
Make sure the brushes are totally seated to the comm.
You want a full arc across the edge.
You can always pull a brush and check to see if it has fully seated or not.
If you don't like the noise and time, you could always try the water break-in method.
Only takes a couple of minutes and almost silent.
There are Pros that swear by this method and other Pros that put it down?
Which Pro is "correcter"?
Rick Bennardo "Professional Tinkerer" LIKE my Facebook page for updates, new releases, and sales: Rgeo Slots.
Basically I run the motor and watch current draw, as the motor heats up it starts to draw less and less current - at some stage - say about five min in you hear a definite change in RPM as the revs go up - this seems to coincide with the minimum current draw.
My view has been this is the point when the run in is finished.
Leaving the motor longer to me seems to be a negative thing to do and more likely to cause excessive carbon build-up on the com.
On a new motor or one that's been "rebuilt" quotes because the word means different things to different people you're looking at the entire system as it runs for the first time.
There's the bushings or bearings to consider, the springs, the leads and shunts if applicableendplay, etc.
You can see how it's all working together and make any minor corrections on a bench before you install the motor in a car.
I think that, besides running-in the brushes, a few minutes break-in is the time to let the motor settle-in and be sure it's all doing what you want it to.
I've used both water and run in, and have gotten good results with both.
However, water break-in can be tricky at first if you're new to this.
OWH has a thread on this topic, and if you follow the instructions as written, you can get very good results and save a ton of time.
I remember when I first heard about water break-in, I thought it was crazy!!
But after giving it a try, it didn't take me long to see the advantage.
The only problem I had was I was one of the people who had a bad batch of brushes that went away in less than 30 secs in water at 4 volts.
After having that happen I decided to go back to the old way of doing things, and have stuck with the old tried and true ways.
For myself, I like running them in for a couple of different reasons.
One, being that I can hear what's going on, and two, being I like to watch the amp draw as the motor breaks-in.
I'm not saying it's the right way, Its just what seems to work for me.
I'll usually run them for 20-30 mins starting at 4 volts and working my way up to 6, checking heat and amps as I go.
You can usually tell by pitch and amps when it's enough time.
The pitch will become steady and the amp draw will even off and remain steady as well.
If it's a dud, it doesn't matter how much time you break it in, or how you break it in, it's still going to be a turd.
How does it help?
What this does is allow the brush to more fully contact the commutator over a wider area effectively reducing motor resistance, consequently increasing motor powerwhich reduces the amount of electricity that flows through a given piece of the brush.
This in turn reduces resistance and arcing between the bushes and the commutator as the current is transferred to the commutator over a wider contact patchwhich also alleviates the microscopic pitting, excessive carbon soot build-up, and ho slot car break in box heat build-up.
All of this in turn makes the motor last longer, be more reliable, and draw current more predictably and run more efficiently see note at the endwhich results in better and longer battery life.
The carbon soot is non-conductive, and adds resistance to a motor, which causes it to heat more where the resistance is, which can cause the brushes to fuse to the commutatorand loose power because energy is being wasted in resistance in the form of heat before it ever even gets to the motor windings.
The arcing in the motor over a smaller surface area, such as using phrase slot boxes remarkable motor that has not been broken-in, causes more electricity in a smaller area of the brush, which causes more heat in that particular area, which basically burns the carbon brushes creating the high resistance carbon soot, and also creates microscopic pits in the commutator and brush where the electricity arced from and to.
This basically creates microscopic sand paper that also contributes to the early demise of the motor.
This is a double drawback because it consumes the brushes faster, and causes pitting and carbon build-up which reduces the power of the motor, the battery life, and causes excessive heating in the motor which can fuse the brushes to the commutator.
Types tesco free voucher codes Break-ins: Wet or Dry, Why or Why Not?
I have heard several explanations of the break-in process, and some of them involve putting the motor in water, link alcohol.
There are a few reasons to do some of these, and a few reasons not to.
The main reasons I have heard to do the break-in in water is to reduce pitting during motor arcing in the break-in, and to keep the temperature down low, and wash away the carbon buildup during break-in.
To dispel some myths about water break-ins, no, it will not short circuit, nor will it fry the motor, or over current the batteries or whatever you are using to break-in your motor.
To test this for yourself take an ohm meter and place the probes in the water, and vary the distance between them.
You will see that the ohm reading is quite high, though it still conducts electricity.
Also it should be noted that pure water is among the best insulators on the planet.
It is just the ion and particles dispersed in the water that conduct the electricity such as lime calcium magnesium and salt.
One thing to note with a water break-in however is that it is best to use distilled water if you are going to use water to break-in your motors.
The reason for this is because regular water or hard water can leave a residue link minerals on the motor parts, which could cause undesirable performance, or corrosion, and it does not conduct electricity.
Another thing to note with the water break-in is that there are small nooks and crannies in DC motors for water to stay, and over time rust and corrode the inside of the motor.
These places include the spaces between the commutator, between the commutator and the armature windings, where the armature meets the shaft, in between the plates of the armature, and so on.
All the water needs to be forced out somehow.
Taking the motor apart is not preferred because it can change how the brushes seat, effectively reducing your break-in.
A lot of people use compressed air, especially the motors with a hole in the side of the can.
Obviously the smaller motors are much harder to get the water out of.
The main thing is they want a hot running engine that will get a little more umph than the competition, without regards to longevity.
The other thing is that most slot cars have very open motors that you can get the water out of easily.
Now to rubbing alcohol.
This provides many of the same benefits as the water break-in, such as reduced motor temps, reduced to no pitting from arcing, but also adds a much better cleaning power for the commutator and the brush contacts.
Alcohol also has a much higher vapor pressure, which basically means it evaporates faster and more completely than water, causing less corrosion.
Alcohol is also flammable so caution needs to be taken that way, although I really doubt that anything would catch on fire with such low current and voltages.
I've tried water but I prefer dry.
I usually run the motors in on my power supply at low voltages 2.
I have run Falcon motors over night before I've seen the brushes get fully seated 6-8 hrs.
I used to race wing cars fifteen years ago and would break-in motors Box 12, Int 15, G27, G7 at around 3 volts until the motor "settled", usually 20-30 mins.
Of source, I radiused the motor brushes first.
I have used a naphtha drip after water break-in, and that seems to work good.
As I mentioned above, I had some brush problems with the last few water break-ins I did, but that was a while back and I'd be willing to give it another try now.
Water break -n does seem to work really well providing you have good brushes LOL.
Also as said above, it's very important to get all the water out.
I use about 40-50 psi of compressed air, blow it out real good, oil it up, run it at 4 volts using a couple drops of naphtha on the comm for a few mins and done deal.
If you have noticed, motors have a slow period up to the peak period then downhill to the point of needing rebuilding.
The peak period is what you want in a motor that is to be raced, hence the break-in of the brushes to the peak point in the motor's performance.
That ensures you have a fast car from the start and hopefully throughout the race.
It sure beats the heck out of putting a new motor in a car and having to wait for the brushes to seat before you become competitive.
Listen to all these guys, they are a wealth of knowledge.
visit web page pure alcohol is fine as a break-in medium but take note that many rubbing alcohols contain oils as additives.
Pete Varlan The most radical of revolutionaries inevitably becomes an arch conservative immediately after his revolution succeeds.
Rick Bennardo "Professional Tinkerer" LIKE my Facebook page for updates, new releases, and sales: Rgeo Slots.
Naphtha has oil in it.
Pull the motor out of the water when it running and listen to that arching that is pitting the comm.
Don't get all the water and slurry out from between the brushes and hood and you asking for a "stuck" brush in the hood in learn more here middle of a race.
A waste of alcohol IMO.
You always want to radius the brushes before breaking in the motor.
You want to run them in dry so you can find out what the motor does when it get warmer.
I have had arms fry when I was running them in dry.
I would rather have them fry on the power pack versus in the middle of a race.
I also like to know how hot a motor may get in the shop versus at the track and after the motor is in the car.
If the motor runs cool on the power supply and gets real hot pandoras box slot game the track.
Also by running them in dry.
Water-dipping a motor for 30 seconds or whatever some rocket scientist tells you then blowing them out and reving them on a power supply tells you nothing about the bad brushes, springs, spacing, or bushings or bearings.
If you don't like listening to the motor run in.
The difference in time depends on the class of the arm and the RPM of the motor.
This is at 3 to 4 volts.
Many times I will put on higher tension springs on motors to break them in while increasing the voltage.
This causes quicker run-in time, less arching as long as the motor doesn't run too hot due to increased spring tension.
If you can't hold the motor and count to five because it's too hot.
To tell if your brushes are fully seated.
Look at the face of the brush.
There is no actual time it take to run in a motor.
Three volts on my power supply.
Don't trust the volt meter on boxing day races newcastle dress power supply.
Water-dipping is nothing but a "short cut" to motor building and prepping motors.
If you're going to water dip your motors you may as well quit retruing your commutators as that will save you a little time, too.
One blast down the straightaway and your comm is all sooted up.
I got my answer in a roundabout way.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run time, it's just the brushes.
I use an inertia dyno to develop my motor programs.
I've tried dozens of variations of the break-in: wet, semi-wet atomized mistand dry with all manner of finishes, and with many different brushes, winds, and magnet set-ups.
Ceramic Hawks to Open 7 multi-wound quad Neo motors exceeding one full RMS horsepower.
I have yet to see an improvement on the dyno that didn't directly ho slot car break in box quantifiably translate to the track.
Best method to date has been wet, in water, no naphtha finish, and a good 100 psi compressed air blow-out.
One micro drop of KD brush lube turned by hand several revolutions followed by about 15 seconds at 3 volts dry time, just to check and record base amperage for that motor.
I keep a book.
I start with the power supply pre-set and go in five second burst to check brush hardness before committing the package fully to the break-in.
Sometimes it's done in 5 seconds, sometimes 90 seconds.
Lowest voltage is 1.
Just my experience, use what ya can, ignore the rest.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run time it's just the brushes.
Yep, if I was drag racing.
I would probably break the brushes in under water.
In drag racing they have to run tesco free voucher codes />Having said that doesn't mean I don't watch.
In drag racing we run around 16 volts, road cars 14-ish.
We drop the full voltage over the arm the entire race.
Road cars are not only throttled but choked.
My heats last under.
Enduro racing over several hours.
Road cars run in spray glue, we run in a river of drag glue and ask every last watt of the motor.
Current loads are huge.
We, at the quickest levels, rarely use a wiper and the control is more akin to dropping a copper bar over the terminals drawing upward of twice the current on the launch as an open wing will from a standstill.
I read in another thread on this board somewhere where a racer hooked an O-scope to a road track to find the current spike racing an open and if I remember right is was about 125 amps averaging around 65 amps a lap?
I can tach over 250 amps on the hit and still be pulling over a 100 amps out the back on tracks that can supply that much current.
Point is, current related heat is an issue at the top levels, a big issue.
We "ice" the arm with liquid butane between rounds.
Failure to do so will smoke an arm in the late rounds where there is little time in as little as two passes thus endurance is also an issue.
We run the same motor for two to four rounds of qualifying and four rounds during the event.
I use my method to extend that to around ten to twelve passes.
Granted, ten passes is under 5 seconds of racing between rebuilds.
It would be rare indeed to see a semi or finals race pass quicker than qualifying.
In fact, I'd bet my last pair of blue socks that a Neo open could not make a full King road lap.
An open road motor can spin well over 200,000 RPM.
this web page run so much spring and such heavy magnets that 150,000 is hard to reach.
We beat that comm harder in 2.
Heat-related comm failures are very common, often eliminating over half the field.
Early traction loss will take a few more to either winding toss or tire explosions.
Given all that I wouldn't attempt to run a Nitro motor in an Indy car or an Indy motor is a Nitro car.
They are worlds apart.
As such, I have no real useful input on what makes a great road motor, how to build one or how to tune one.
Break-in is certainly part of that tune-up.
I can only wonder that if I can double my motor life, peak performance that is, a few rounds by this method how that "might" play out for a road motor.
I marvel watching Open 7 wings and just cannot figure out how you can drive a car the eye can't follow.

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WET PROCESS BREAK-IN Ho slot car break in box FOR SEALED-CAN MOTORS 1.
PURPOSE To Maximize electrical contact between rotating commutator and stationary brushes for optimum performance.
Higher current creates more powerful fields and the resultant higher speeds as exemplified when a slot car is at full throttle voltage.
The break-in process articulates the contact surface of the brushes to the curved commutator surface through frictional wear for maximum contact with minimal power loss due to resistance.
Sealed-can motors such as the Ninco NC-1 are made non-serviceable with brushes of a relatively hard composition to extend motor life without brush replacement.
This hard brush material wears the commutator surface during break-in creating diminishing returns, i.
Wet break-in theoretically allows efficient break-in while protecting the commutator from excessive wear.
I use disposable clear plastic cups from Costco so that water condition is visible and may be changed when noticeably contaminated.
Final dry break-in 5.
click example, my Ninco Le Mans car was faster without weight added while testing alone, but very vulnerable to tesco free voucher codes side contact from another car causing it to de-slot.
I added a bit of weight and it became much more stable in competition albeit a tad slower.
I was also able to determine that I was giving up about one car length to average cars in each straight and that I need to work on that.
Here are the rest of my thoughts ho slot car break in box testing my cars and observing others: Weight tuned classes 1.
The thin weight sheets from Victory Station are the best.
The adhesive is reliable even in tesco free voucher codes crashes yet removable with some effort without ANY damage to the chassis whatsoever and the thinness prevents contact with the track.
Optimal weight for our cars is between 75 and 90 grams total and weight should be placed under the chassis in front of the rear axle and extend to approximately half way between the motor and the guide.
Distance from guide pivot measured to rear axle divided by distance from horizontal CG slipknot location when car is dangling perfectly balanced front to rear measured to rear axle, multiplied by 100, equals the weight bias percentage.
By day's end I had added weight to the Saleen, added more weight to the rear of the Cobra, and shifted some weight from front to rear on the RS200, all based solely on handling characteristics.
Despite the fact that each car is very different, the horizontal weight slot watch box is now very much the same for all three at approximately 35% front and 65% rear + - 1mm measuring tolerance from the rear axle to the guide pivot and the CG is also nearly identical at approximately ho slot car break in box above the rear axle for the Saleen and 2 mm for both the RS200and Cobra.
Of course, learn more here optimal balance will vary depending on traction and track conditions.
With everything set up properly such as tire truing and sizes, front axle movement, braids, and etc.
Front axle movement: Rules dictate that front tires MUST touch the track and roll when the car moves but it is legal and advisable to true the front tires so that some of the car's front end weight rests on the guide.
It's much easier to eliminate drag than to find an especially good motor.
Carefully oil the motor and axle bearings and use plastic-friendly light grease on the gears.
Check cars carefully to be certain that everything moves smoothly and freely.
If you have a "rolling road", great, but if not you can lay the car on its roof and use 2 to 4 volts for about an hour to gain noticeable improvements I use a mobile phone charger rated at 3.
Keep close watch on it, stop and ho slot car break in box everything if anything seems wrong such as rubbing, binding, or excessive heat in the motor.
Braids can cause cars to run slower even when they may not hesitate or stop and they can also cause them to deslot more easily.
Take the time to fray the ends slightly; make certain they are smooth and straight with enough pressure for good contact but not so much that they keep the guide from resting all the way into the slot.
Plastic molded wheels and tires are seriously out of round so it pays to check them carefully and realize that they may need more than a little sanding on the truing block.
Most are very loose and based on my personal experience I believe that proper truing and freeing up the chassis makes a huge difference.
RenΓ© taught me this when he fixed my Minardi from sloppy loose into one of the faster cars in the class.
Of course, I could be wrong so consider my thoughts with a grain of salt so to speak and be amused at least.

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The diagram at right shows the wiring of a typical 1:24 or 1:32 slot car setup. Power for the car's motor is carried by metal strips next to the slot, and is picked up by contacts alongside the guide flag (a swiveling blade) under the front of the slot car. The voltage is varied by a resistor in the hand controller.


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Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated or is there another reason you run them in for 20 plus minutes?
I have a feeling I know the answer but I wanted to get the info from some of the pros out in slot car land.
But, I have a question, to your question.
Should you only run the motor on the power supply until the brush comm contact patch is perfectly mated?
If you have a way to determine at what point the brushes have a perfect contact patch, I would be interested in that?
I can't tell if they are perfect but I was just making sure the only reason you run a motor is to mate the comm and the brushes.
I guess I was wondering if the comm needed to run and get some???
Just a question I was thinking about today while the motor I was breaking-in was giving me a headache because of the high pitch it was making.
Thanks, Dallas PS: I have seen some of your info on here on other topics and I would say you know what you're talking about so that would make you a Pro.
The purpose of "break-in" is to mate the brush surface to the comm surface as perfectly as possible.
The definition of "perfect" varies, depending on the type of motor.
In a G12 motor, you can remove the brushes and eyeball the elliptical curve of the brush faces.
If and when both brush faces appear perfectly elliptical, you have achieved the goal of "perfectly-mated brush contact comm patch".
Anything further than this is outside my expertise.
I am just an amateur.
PM Hershman or Wells or Swiss to gain more info.
If your motor sounded "high pitch", that may be a good thing.
Make sure the brushes are totally seated to the comm.
You want a full arc across the edge.
You can always pull a brush and check to see if it has fully seated or not.
If you don't like the noise and time, you could always try the water break-in method.
Only takes a couple of minutes and almost silent.
There are Pros that swear by this method and other Pros that put it down?
Which Pro is "correcter"?
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Basically I run the motor and watch current draw, as the motor heats up it starts to draw less and less current - at some stage - say about five min in you hear a definite change in RPM as the revs go up - this seems to coincide with the minimum current draw.
My view has been this is the point when the run in is finished.
Leaving the motor longer to me seems to be a negative thing to do and click to see more likely to cause excessive carbon build-up on the com.
On a new motor or one that's been "rebuilt" quotes because the word means different things to different people you're looking at the entire system as it runs for the first time.
There's the bushings or bearings to consider, the springs, the leads and shunts if applicableendplay, etc.
You can see how it's all working together and make any minor corrections on a bench before you install the motor in a car.
I think that, besides running-in the brushes, box lock coin slot few minutes break-in is the time to let the motor settle-in and be sure it's all doing what you want it to.
I've used both water and run in, and have gotten good results with both.
However, water break-in can be tricky at first if you're new to this.
OWH has a thread on this topic, and if you follow the instructions as written, you can get very good results and save a ton of time.
I remember when I first heard about water break-in, I thought it was crazy!!
But after giving it a try, it didn't take me long to see the advantage.
The only problem I had was I was one of the people who had a bad batch of brushes that went away in less than 30 secs in water at 4 volts.
After having that happen I decided to go back to the old way of doing things, and have stuck with the old tried and true ways.
For myself, I like running them in for a couple of different reasons.
One, being that I can hear what's going on, and two, being I like to watch the amp draw as the motor breaks-in.
I'm not saying it's the right way, Its just what seems to work for me.
I'll usually run them for 20-30 mins starting at 4 volts and working my way up to 6, checking heat and amps as I go.
You can usually tell by pitch and amps when it's enough time.
The pitch will become steady and the amp draw will even off and remain steady as well.
If it's a dud, it doesn't matter how much time you break it in, or how you break it in, it's still going to be a turd.
How does it help?
What this does is allow the brush to more fully contact the commutator over a wider area effectively reducing motor resistance, consequently increasing motor powerwhich reduces the amount of electricity that flows through a given piece of the brush.
This in turn reduces resistance and arcing between the bushes and the commutator as the current is transferred to the commutator over a wider contact patchwhich also alleviates the microscopic pitting, excessive carbon go here build-up, and excessive heat build-up.
All of this in turn makes the motor last longer, be more reliable, and draw current more predictably and run more efficiently see note at the endwhich results in better and longer battery life.
The carbon soot is non-conductive, and adds resistance to a motor, which causes it to heat more where the resistance is, which can cause the brushes to fuse to the commutatorand loose power because energy is being wasted in resistance in the form of heat before it ever even gets to the motor windings.
The arcing in the motor over a smaller surface area, such as using a motor that has not been broken-in, causes more electricity in a smaller area of the brush, which causes more heat in that particular area, which basically burns the carbon brushes creating the high resistance carbon soot, and also creates microscopic pits in the commutator and brush where the electricity arced from and to.
This basically creates microscopic sand paper that also contributes to the early demise of the motor.
This ho slot car break in box a double drawback because it consumes the brushes faster, and causes pitting and carbon build-up which reduces the power of the motor, the battery life, and causes excessive heating in the motor which can fuse the brushes to the commutator.
Types of Break-ins: Wet or Dry, Why or Why Not?
I have heard several explanations of ho slot car break in box break-in process, and some of them involve putting the motor in water, rubbing alcohol.
There are a few reasons to do some of these, and a few reasons not to.
The main reasons I have heard to do the break-in in water is to reduce pitting during motor arcing in the break-in, and to keep the temperature down low, and wash away the carbon buildup during break-in.
To dispel some myths about water break-ins, no, it will not short circuit, nor will it fry the motor, or over current the batteries or whatever you are using to break-in your motor.
To test this for yourself take an ohm meter and place the probes in the water, and vary the distance between them.
You will https://crimeaorg.info/box/euro-slot-boxes.html that the ohm reading is quite high, though it still conducts electricity.
Also it should be noted that pure water is among the best insulators on the planet.
It is just the ho slot car break in box and particles dispersed in the water that conduct the electricity such as lime calcium magnesium and salt.
One thing to note with a water break-in however is that it is best to use distilled water if you are going to use water to break-in your motors.
The reason for this is because regular water or hard water can leave a residue of minerals on the motor parts, which could cause undesirable performance, or corrosion, and it does not conduct electricity.
Another thing to note with the water break-in is that there are small nooks and crannies in DC motors for water to stay, and over time rust and corrode the inside of the motor.
These places include the spaces between the commutator, between the commutator and the armature windings, where the armature meets the shaft, in between the plates of the armature, and so on.
All the water needs to be forced out somehow.
Taking the motor apart is not preferred because it can change how the brushes seat, effectively reducing your break-in.
A lot of people use compressed air, especially the motors with a hole in the side of the can.
Obviously the smaller motors are much harder to get the water out of.
The main thing is they want a hot running engine that will get a little more umph than the competition, without regards to longevity.
The other thing is that most slot cars have very open motors that you can get the water out of easily.
Now to rubbing alcohol.
This provides many of the same benefits as the water break-in, such as reduced motor temps, reduced to no pitting from arcing, but also adds a much better cleaning power for the commutator and the brush contacts.
Alcohol also has a much higher vapor pressure, which basically means it evaporates faster and more completely than water, causing less corrosion.
Alcohol is also flammable so caution needs to be taken that tesco free voucher codes, although I really doubt that anything would catch on fire with such low current and voltages.
I've tried water but I prefer dry.
I usually run the motors in on my tesco free voucher codes supply at low voltages 2.
I have run Falcon motors over night before I've seen the brushes get fully seated 6-8 hrs.
I used to race wing cars fifteen years ago and would break-in motors Box 12, Int 15, G27, G7 at around 3 volts until the motor "settled", usually 20-30 mins.
Of course, I radiused the motor brushes first.
I have used a naphtha drip after water break-in, and that seems to work good.
As I mentioned above, I had some brush problems with the last few water break-ins I did, but that was a while back and I'd be willing ups deposit give it another try now.
Water break -n does seem to work really well providing you have good brushes LOL.
Also as said above, it's very important to get all the water out.
I use about 40-50 psi of compressed air, blow it out real good, oil it up, run it at 4 volts using a couple drops of naphtha on the comm for a few mins and this web page deal.
If you have noticed, motors have a box codes period up to the peak period then downhill to the point of needing rebuilding.
The peak period is what you want in a motor that is to be raced, hence the break-in of the brushes to the peak point in the motor's performance.
That ensures you have a fast car from the start and hopefully throughout the race.
It sure beats the heck out of putting a new motor in a car and having to wait for the brushes to seat before you become competitive.
Listen to all these guys, they are a wealth of knowledge.
A pure article source is fine as a break-in medium but take note that many rubbing alcohols contain oils as additives.
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Naphtha has oil in it.
Pull the motor out of the water when it running and listen to that arching that is pitting the comm.
Don't get all the water and slurry out from between the brushes and hood and you asking for a "stuck" brush in the hood in the middle of a race.
A waste of alcohol IMO.
You always want to radius the brushes before breaking in the motor.
You want to run them in dry so you can find out what the motor does when it get warmer.
I have had arms fry search box html codes I was running them in dry.
I would rather have them fry on the power pack versus in the middle of a race.
I also like to know how hot a motor may get in the win facebook money versus at the track and after the motor is in the car.
If the motor runs cool on the power supply and gets real hot on the track.
Also by running them in dry.
Water-dipping a motor for 30 seconds or whatever some rocket scientist tells you then blowing them out and reving them on a power supply tells you nothing about the bad brushes, springs, spacing, or bushings or bearings.
If you don't like listening to the motor run in.
The difference in time depends on the class of the arm and the RPM of the motor.
This is at 3 to 4 volts.
Many times I will put on higher tension springs on motors to break them in while increasing the voltage.
This causes quicker run-in time, less arching as long as the motor doesn't run too hot due to increased spring tension.
If you can't hold the motor and count to five because it's too hot.
To tell if your brushes are fully seated.
Look at tesco free voucher codes face of the brush.
There is no actual time it take to run in a motor.
Three volts on my power supply.
Don't trust the volt meter on your power supply.
Water-dipping is nothing but a "short cut" to motor building and prepping motors.
If you're going to water dip your motors you may as well quit retruing your commutators as that will save you a little time, too.
One blast down the straightaway and your comm is all sooted up.
I got my answer in a roundabout way.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run time, it's just the brushes.
I use an inertia dyno to develop my motor programs.
I've tried dozens of variations of the break-in: wet, semi-wet atomized mistand dry with all manner of finishes, and with many different brushes, winds, and magnet set-ups.
Ceramic Hawks to Open 7 multi-wound quad Neo motors exceeding one full RMS horsepower.
I have yet to see an improvement on the dyno that didn't directly and quantifiably translate to the track.
Best method to date has been wet, in water, no naphtha finish, and a good 100 psi compressed air blow-out.
One micro drop of KD brush lube turned by hand several revolutions followed by about 15 seconds at 3 volts dry time, just to check and record base amperage for that motor.
I keep a book.
I start with the power supply pre-set and go in five second burst to check brush hardness before committing the package fully to the break-in.
Sometimes it's done in 5 seconds, sometimes 90 seconds.
Lowest voltage is 1.
Just my experience, use what ya can, ignore the rest.
So once the brushes are seated that is perfect and no more.
The new comm doesn't need run time it's just the brushes.
Yep, if I was drag racing.
I would probably break the brushes in under water.
In drag racing they have to run 1.
Having said that doesn't mean I don't watch.
In drag racing we run around 16 volts, road cars 14-ish.
We drop the full voltage over the arm the entire race.
Road cars are not only throttled but choked.
My heats last under.
Enduro racing over several hours.
Road cars run in spray glue, we run in a river of drag glue and ask every last watt of the motor.
Current loads are huge.
We, at the quickest levels, rarely use a wiper and the control is more akin to dropping a copper bar over the terminals drawing upward of twice the current on the launch as an open wing will from a standstill.
I read in another thread on this board somewhere where a racer hooked an O-scope to a road track to find the current spike racing an open and if I remember right is was about 125 amps averaging around 65 amps a lap?
I can tach over 250 amps on the hit and still be pulling over a 100 amps out the back on tracks that can supply that much current.
Point is, current related heat is an issue at the top levels, a big issue.
We "ice" the arm with liquid butane between rounds.
Failure to do so will smoke an arm in the late rounds where there is little time in as little as two passes thus endurance is also an issue.
We run the same motor for two to four rounds of qualifying and four rounds during the event.
I use my method to extend that to around ten to twelve passes.
Granted, ten passes is under 5 seconds of racing between rebuilds.
It would be rare indeed to see a semi or finals race pass quicker than qualifying.
In fact, I'd bet my last pair of blue socks that a Neo open could not make a full King road lap.
An open road motor can spin well over 200,000 RPM.
We run so much spring and such heavy magnets that 150,000 is hard to reach.
We beat that comm harder in 2.
Heat-related comm failures are very common, often eliminating over half the field.
Early traction loss will take a few more to either winding toss or tire explosions.
Given all that I wouldn't attempt to run a Nitro motor in an Indy car or an Indy motor is a Nitro car.
They are worlds apart.
As such, I have no real useful input on what makes a great road motor, how to build one or how to tune one.
Break-in is certainly part of that tune-up.
I can only wonder that if I can double my motor life, peak performance that is, a few rounds by this method how that "might" play out for a road motor.
I marvel watching Open 7 wings and just cannot figure out how you can drive a car the eye can't follow.

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